NOTE: If this is your first time here, it is very important to keep in mind that many of the ideas expressed in this blog represent older versions of myself, and not necessarily my current self. After all, we evolve, and sometimes change our minds. In the meantime, enjoy lurking around, and watch the video trailer for my upcoming book here.

Sudan’s Sex and Beauty Secret

by Drima on December 11, 2007

Read all about it here.

Don’t ask me Sandmonkey. I’ve never dated a Sudanese girl before and even if I did, I’d be crazy to pick one who’ll sit over a burning hole for a whole hour just to make me go “ding dong”. :)

This is an update to clarify some certain points brought up by commenters.

Damn you people! Stop harassing me! :P

Dalu, you asked “why haven’t you ever dated a Sudanese girl?” and Rara Avis, you then added “stop acting all non-sudanese Drima!”

I spent my childhood in Sudan and Qatar. Some of my best friends were Sudanese girls. Since I was a little kid back then, I obviously didn’t date because the thought never popped into my head. Duh! Like I said, I was just a child.

My adult life was spent here in Southeast Asia where there is a huge lack of Sudanese girls, let alone a lack of nice ones. Hence the simple reason I’ve never dated any of “you” my dear Sudanese queens and angels isn’t because I hate “you” but rather because it’s so damn hard finding decent “yous” where I live at the moment. It’s tough out here I tell ya, it’s very tough! :(

Dear Amru, I hit a nerve didn’t I? :)

Bro, just because dukhan is a Sudanese tradition, doesn’t mean I have to like it. I don’t! It’s my own personal taste. I hate the smell of the damn thing. I love Sudanese henna though. I even blogged about it before.

Sexy henna designs make me drool. My future wife, whether Sudanese or not, better get it every once in a while or else I’m divorcing her. :P

Bakhoor* is another thing I like. Like dukhan it’s a Sudanese tradition but hey guess what? I know many Sudanese people who hate its smell or get migraines because of it. Does that make them “unbalanced”?

You also mentioned this:

… dukhan is a practice that pre-dates the times of the Kush Kingdom in Nubia. Its main purpose is to act just like perfume or body lotion and for some it’s used to accent the skin tone or to help in the removal of ‘stretch-marks’ on a woman’s skin.

It would be a lie to say that it does not sexually appeal to men but so do many body lotions and perfumes but that is not all what dukhan is about. To be honest this article is the most unprofessional editorial that I have ever read

Oh please! Come on Amru. Why aren’t you mentioning anything about the ehm tightening properties? Either you’re being naive or you’re purposely avoiding that point.

Yes, it’s true. Dukhan does indeed change the tone of a woman’s skin and do what you mentioned. It gives off a scent which many (but not all) Sudanese men find appealing too.

I found out about the ehm tightening effects (God, I hate that phrase now) of dukhan about a year ago when I was chilling with older Sudanese guys some of whom were married. Of all the effects it produces, guess which one they focused on and got excited by the most?

The article isn’t ill-conceived my friend. Personally I find it daring and rather alright. It does however focus on presenting the two extremes. On one side you’ve got men celebrating the tightening aspects and others on the opposite side calling the practice ignorant. I guess you stand somewhere in the middle.

Kawther, welcome to the club. That was my exact reaction when I found out about Dukhan’s “hidden truth”.

* Bakhoor is a special scented type of wood placed burned in small amounts mostly in Sudanese homes for different reasons by different people. It also gets burned a lot during special occasions like Eid and weddings.

Some believe burning it scares away the evil spirits. Others (like me) burn it simply because the scent is wonderful and creates a festive atmosphere.



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{ 39 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Dalu 12.11.07 at 9:17 pm

WHAT!????

The bigger question is why haven’t you ever dated a Sudanese girl? :P

Otherwise, no comment on the article itself. bleh.

2 Dalu 12.11.07 at 9:24 pm

Also, oh. Haha, I don’t know if the other comment got posted or not. But, I have no idea why I put in gibberish for the “website” section. My brain is going crazy from studying for finals. :(

But, that’s just…gross. My feminist and womanly sensibilities revolt against this. We once spent a whole discussion period just talking about the 9789890809 ways to tighten up your vag walls. It’s not just an arab or african or asian..or wahtever thing. You’d be surprised how many things exist in the market here in the U.S. to “tighten” things up.

The hilarious thing is, it’s never really about what the woman feels or enjoys. It’s all about the man. Women only feel anything 4 inches in, the rest is just like a gapping hole with no sensationw whatsoever. And an even bigger percentage of women don’t even gain any pleasure from penetrative sex. So yea.

Gross.

But if you must tighten things up. Why not just do Kegels? Geez. That way you don’t have to take out a whole day just for that mess. You can get kegels done while making dinner, at the office, in the market place….

3 halalhippie 12.11.07 at 10:19 pm

In the Al-Arabiya article, I stumbled upon:

“In the West, where pampered women splurge thousands of dollars for a surgeon to reattach hymens and tighten vaginas as a “gift” to the men in their lives, the natural remedy is a fraction of the price in Sudan.”

what ? women in the West re-hymenize ? Only ones I ever heard of are wayward Muslim girls who are afraid to get killed for not being virgins. And tightening things up ? Well, I guess it happens, but I never heard of it.

Why would a Sudanese woman want to tighten things up anyway ? I read on a blog somewhere :-) that Sudanese men are … ahem … well-to-do.

I can totally dig the heating up and smelling nice part, though. Any hot Sudanese ladies in Denmark wanna share some culture with me ?

4 Rara Avis 12.12.07 at 3:41 am

stop acting all non-sudanese Drima!
All MARRIED sudanese women do aldu’7an
my female relatives did/do it
your female relatives did/do and will do it

but frankly, for some odd reason, when i see the legs of a woman after her sudanese “smoke” session, i remember the famous Russian smoked fish. Same colour I tell ya

5 Rara Avis 12.12.07 at 3:51 am

and now that I’ve processed it
I actually find the article and the claims of its sexual arousal capabilities very despicable

garaf!

6 Amru 12.12.07 at 6:57 am

Dirma why am I suddenly disappointed by this comment of yours? Dukhan is in our culture and is a major Sudanese tradition. I would at least expect to see a more balanced view than this ‘ding dong’ comment coming from someone using a screen name “Sudanese” Thinker. You might be sarcastic but you are obliged to give a fair and clear view if you represent Sudanese to a foreign audience, else I would advice you rethink your title.

To those that might be quick to judge this tradition based on this ill-conceived article, dukhan is a practice that pre-dates the times of the Kush Kingdom in Nubia. Its main purpose is to act just like perfume or body lotion and for some it’s used to accent the skin tone or to help in the removal of ‘stretch-marks’ on a woman’s skin.

It would be a lie to say that it does not sexually appeal to men but so do many body lotions and perfumes but that is not all what dukhan is about. To be honest this article is the most unprofessional editorial that I have ever read, its quality is not even good enough for a local gossip magazine or blog and without a doubt it is not worth being carried by the AFP.

Personally I find the scent of Dukhan very appealing and I sure do hope my wife practices this very beautiful tradition.

Amru

7 Hipster 12.12.07 at 7:40 am

Drima, I second Amru.I am extremely disappointed!

“Dukhan” is just like the other beautiful traditions in Sudan, be it Henna or the ritual seductive dance and so on and so forth.”Craziness” has nothing to do with it & from what I have seen, it does have beautifying and healing powers.

8 Amru 12.12.07 at 7:40 am

By article I was refering to the Al-Arabia article, which is the main source of this topic.

9 Kawthar 12.12.07 at 9:20 am

And all these years, I thought it was simply a traditional alternative to sauna. How naive of me!

Its only now though that I understand why it’s off-limits for unmarried women.

I’ll definitely be viewing this practice in an entirely different light from now on

10 Dalu 12.12.07 at 10:58 am

What part of Sudanese culture is this that I have never head off??!!! Is this a muslim, northern arab Sudanese thing or what? Let me go ask my mother….

But as for now. It’s ok, Drima. This is also news to me…. :s

Halal Hippie, women in the U.S. (don’t know about western countries) don’t do it to re-virginize, but to be more sexually pleasurable. Especially after giving birth which kinda messes things up.

I have been to sex parties (EDUCATIONAL REASONS, OK? :P ) where there are creams (an some “natural oils”) and other novelties fir such purposes. Also it’s hilarious how on the back of these bottles it usually says things like MIGHT CAUSE EXTREME DRYNESS, TEAR IN VAGINAL WALLS, INFECTIONS AND POSSIBLY STERLIZATION, yet women fall over themselves to get some.

Also, some tools look more like torture devices to be honest….It’s like you want me to put this up where? And do what now? Oh hell no!

Yup.

11 Asma Ana 12.13.07 at 4:44 am

Personally being from a part of Sudan, which is not part of the north, the dukhan thing is anathema in my culture. But I do know the sexual overtones associated with it. Suffice to say, when I was in Sudan I was too young to ever bang any woman who uses dukhan. But I do have buddies who have done so and they all have praise for dukhan. If it increases libido, I say go for it! Amru, you are one hell of a lucky chap if your wife uses it. There’s nothing like Knocking boots with a dukhan-using woman, so my friends say. Let’s all celebrate dukhan, I tell ya!

12 Howie 12.13.07 at 6:13 am

Me…who cares if women want to smoke in this fashion. But could put a whole new meaning to “lip cancer”.

13 Drima 12.13.07 at 3:09 pm

If dukhan didn’t smell so icky, I might have been a potential fan but no no no.

14 Dalu 12.13.07 at 3:38 pm

“Me…who cares if women want to smoke in this fashion. But could put a whole new meaning to “lip cancer”.”

I laughed. :(

But, I don’t think it’s the women’s fault alone. They play into it because men like it also. So these women are doing possibly harmful things in order to be more pleasing. I mean got forbid you don’t feel like a virgin every time you are penetrated.

Reminds me of an article I read about women in some part of Kenya who actually use BLEACH to “tighten” things up. :s Ouch.

I am trying, really hard to think of a “beautifying” rituals for men (that are harmful) and cannot for the life of me come out with any. Ok, so boohoo, men have to practice decent hygiene and occasionally remove facial hair.

Sometimes when I feel especially horrible, I demand that in order for me to shave or wax anything at all my partner has to undergo the same treatment. :)

Drima, my questioning was in no way meant to put you on the spot. :P Ok, maybe it was meant to. A little…

But I understand what you mean. I barely spent time in Sudan and because I am outside of home, the chances of meeting a half decent Sudanese guy becomes even more narrow. :(

Oh yea, also. Tightening, tightening, tightening, tightening, tightening, tightening, tightening, tightening. haha.

lol, at Amru avoiding the tightening effects. Come on! That’s pretty much the main point of the whole practice.

Maybe I am overly westernized (in the feminist sense) but isn’t a woman’s natural scent sufficient enough to “turn guys on?” I have never found myself much attracted to artificial scents.

For example I hate most male colognes and other body sprays.

Also, what I want to know is if it causes any infections. Especially yeast infections.

15 Drima 12.13.07 at 3:55 pm

Hehe :)

Btw Dalu, what happened to your blog? Why did you delete it? Grrr!!

And ya you get the thing about not being able to date Sudanese.

16 Dalu 12.13.07 at 4:01 pm

More topics like this, yes.

This totally reminds me, on a completely different note…I was put on the spot in a class once for being Sudanese. The fuckin’ professor just assumed that since I was Sudanese that I must have undergone FGM, and that I should totally “Share” with them and educate them on this atrocity. :(

I really have to go study now. :(

17 Amru 12.13.07 at 4:24 pm

Salam Dirma,

I see you are starting to adapt the fallacy – argument approach.

I never said that you ‘must like dukhan’ my first paragraph in the comment was directed at how you phrased your opinion, “I’d be crazy to pick one who’ll sit over a burning hole for a whole hour just to make me go “ding dong””, specifically because the practice is not only about you going “ding-dong”. Maybe you built this opinion because you got your information from ‘some’ Sudanese married MEN. Find you some ladies who will explain to you what dukhan is about and it’s Sauna like effects.

“”Either you’re being naive or you’re purposely avoiding that point.”"

The point being the so called tightening effects, please provide scientific evidence to support your argument other than basing this on hearsay. Like you I have also heard that this ‘one’ of the effects of dukhan but in no way is it a the main reason why women in Sudan practice it nor is it a proven fact. Haven’t you realized that this is mainly practiced MAINLY by newly wed brides, do u think they need to be tightened-up? Take sometime and think this through before hastily replying.

The article is beyond being ill-conceived it is the worst editorial regarding a specific practice within a culture. It is obviously written by some Khawaja that lacks any editorial experience or the bases of conducting editorial research regarding a specific cultural topic.
“”Anwar and her mother Zainab say that like leather, the skin tightens when exposed to slow, low-impact heat. “It’s just like cheese with wine,” says Anwar, trying to draw a parallel between the dukhan in Sudan and Europe.”"
CHEESE AND WINE!?! looool Where is the parallel? Did you really read this cheap article?

I’ll leave you with the comments of Nada a Sudanese Writer/Editor, SHE left them on Al-Arabiya.net website:

“”
Given the caliber of this channel when it FIRST started, I will not have much to say about their news coverage. Given how this channel has become a disgrace, unwatched, paid off to continue airing, and pathetically catered to suit the USA’s political demands, I will have something to say about their coverage on Sudan DUKHAN piece.

AUTHOR: a paradigm should be given on how articles should be written; they have to be well researched, well constructed and mostly, objective. I do gather this is what makes the news…or not? This is by far, worse than Oprah on Arab Muslim women, the most undermining article I have read by a professional Arab news channel/website.

Dukhan is a tradition that is simply done to make women’s skin glowing and softer. It is basically like going into a sauna, except this sauna has a lovely smell. I have never heard of a sauna tightening “vaginas” up as a gift for “penises.” It is very sexually appealing to men, to anyone! However, that is only due to the amazing aroma it leaves on the women’s body. Author, do you bathe? If you bathe using an expensive, lets say Dolce and Gabbana shower gel, I am sure you will understand what the meaning of “aroma” means, and the effect it would leave on you as a normal person, not on your private part.

Not understanding a country’s tradition should not be a line that can be crossed and should not be socially or journalistically accepted even for the sake of so called freedom of speech. Civilised, sadly, is a word created by the west; but being civilised means to properly be aware of other cultures. I highly suggest that next time before your website publishes an article, the author should research properly, if not, should be taught proper research skills by “goat” version of John Tesh.
“”

Have a good one.

18 Asma Ana 12.13.07 at 5:35 pm

Correction, correction…!
Dalu asked how come she has not heard of dukhan.
Amru wrote: “Like you I have also heard that this ‘one’ of the effects of dukhan but in no way is it a the main reason why women in Sudan practice it nor is it a proven fact.”

Underline the word Sudan. Dukhan is NOT used all over the Sudan. To assume that it is a Sudanese thing is a misnomer. It would be correct to say that dukhan is used among CERTAIN ethnicities in Sudan.

19 Amru 12.14.07 at 12:22 am

Greetings Asma Ana,

You misunderstood me, that quote was not directed at Dalu.

But all to make this following point. When I say Dukhan is practiced in Sudan it is not a misnomer, because it is actually practiced in Sudan regardless of it is practiced in every part of Sudan or not. Today we say Arabee Juba is a ‘Sudanese’ language, Arabic is a ‘Sudanese’ language, Dinka is a ‘Sudanese’ language. As long as they are spoken by Sudanese then by definition they are a Sudanese language, I don’t have to classify which region it came from and who speaks it and can call it a Sudanese language period.
Just because Dukhan is not practiced in all of Sudan, doesn’t mean it is not a Sudanese tradition. As a matter of fact some Southern Sudanese women do practice Dukhan, it has somewhat become like a tradition to many in Khartoum. We do not need to over analyze Sudan and start classifying everything Sudanese; into regions, ethnic groups and religions. In my opinion we ought to classify as Sudanese only :)

20 Amru 12.14.07 at 12:44 am

Excuse the typo’s above I kinda wrote it quickly.

Greetings Asma Ana,

You misunderstood me, that quote was not directed at Dalu.

But allow me to make this following point. When I say Dukhan is practiced in Sudan it is not a misnomer, because it is actually practiced in Sudan regardless of if it is practiced in every part of Sudan or not. Today we say Arabee Juba is a ‘Sudanese’ language, Arabic is a ‘Sudanese’ language, Dinka is a ‘Sudanese’ language, as long as they are spoken by Sudanese then by definition they are a Sudanese language, I don’t have to classify which region it came from and who speaks it and I can call it a Sudanese language period.
Just because Dukhan is not practiced in all of Sudan, doesn’t mean it is not a Sudanese tradition. As a matter of fact some Southern Sudanese women do practice Dukhan, it has somewhat become like a tradition to many who live in the melting pot Khartoum. We do not need to over analyze Sudan and start classifying everything Sudanese; into regions, ethnic groups and religions. In my opinion we ought to classify as Sudanese only :)

21 Dalu 12.14.07 at 1:11 am

Amru, something about your putting everyone under a “sudanese” umbrella regardless of their differing ethnicities or cultures is very problematic. (although at the same time it sounds all “warm” and “fuzzy” awwww)

This is funny, because yesterday when I was sitting my geography class during one presentation, a group kept referring to the “sudanese language” (as opposed to Sudanese LANGUAGES) spoken by sudanese present in Malaysia and I kept thinking what the hell? Sudanese is a nationality, not an ethnicity. Within Sudan there are different ethnicities with different cultures and different languages. That is something that cannot be denied or overlooked

Sudanese people are not a monolith. Calling attention to these obvious differences doesn’t have to be seen as “dividing” or as something generally negative. It’s just being correct and stating facts like they are. That’s the reality.

I’d prefer it to be stated as Dukhan is a tradition, ritual…whatever, practiced amongst certain groups in Sudan.

My ethnic group certainly does not practice it, therefore, I would prefer to not be pushed under that umbrella.

_____________________

Yea Drima, I deleted my blog. Maybe I will start again in the future, but for now. No blog.

22 Amru 12.14.07 at 11:55 am

Greetings Dalu,

How can something that is a fact be problematic? They are Sudanese aren’t they? I understand what it is you are saying and as ‘warm’ and ‘fuzzy’ as it may sound, it still holds true because all these ethnicities and cultures are SUDANESE :)
This is what makes us unique and in my opinion this is why we represent Africa as a whole, with a 100+ languages and tribes; it’s beautiful not problematic.

In principal Dukhan is a Sudanese tradition practiced mainly in some Northern, Western and Eastern regions… just to be politically correct

;)

I understand your point completely, but I respectfully disagree :)

23 Drima 12.15.07 at 5:42 am

Salam Amru…

“Maybe you built this opinion because you got your information from ’some’ Sudanese married MEN.”

Hmmm… good point. I’ll reconsider my opinion on Dukhan until I’ve heard it specifically from women instead of men.

Good exchange bro. ;)

There is one thing I’d like to take time to address now though since I didn’t do so previously…

“You might be sarcastic but you are obliged to give a fair and clear view if you represent Sudanese to a foreign audience, else I would advice you rethink your title.”

No.

It’s very obvious when I write seriously. I do so when I have enough time. My recent Pajamas Media article is a perfect example:

The Teddy Bear Circus

Sometimes I’m busy and I provide links with quick short commentary. This is *my* blog and I don’t like being serious all the time simply because I won’t enjoy the process of blogging.

Long time readers can easily tell if I’m serious or just messing around.

I understand some people and at times even many people might not agree with what I say BOTH when I write seriously or when I’m being silly BUT… this is what the comments section is open for.

So basically no, I don’t feel obliged to be fair and balanced 24/7. And I like my blog’s name.

I’m comfortable with the my current style of blogging. I enjoy it and I’m not going to change it.

Last but not least and more importantly however, I welcome disagreement and different opinions. There’s nothing better than a good exchange.

Yalla ya zool. Salam!

Oh and Eid Mubarak in advance. :)

24 Dalu 12.15.07 at 4:41 pm

I see your point Amru. I am just being really nit picky. I mean I disagree but I certainly do see your point. I just still believe that realistically pushing everything under an umbrella like that is just plain iffy.

25 Dalu 12.15.07 at 4:46 pm

what? I posted before I was done talking. A conspiracy I tell you.

to conclude…

it blurs and muddles all of the many distinctive cultures and languages and even religions that Sudan has. We do not have ONE culture, or ONE language. By just saying Sudanese language, as opposed to sudanese languages. Or sudanese culture as opposed to sudanese cultures.

Yea that’s just me being repetitive there.

(also because I personally, get annoyed when different traditions that are not part of my culture gets tagged on me…*shrugs*)

And here too.

Oh vell.

26 Howie 12.16.07 at 12:49 am

A question for all…

Has anybody every considered that cultures, in general…are essentially meaningless…just habits man has developed. Cultures…like anything man made, can be wonderful, stupid or horrific and everything in between.

However, people will fight for “culture” as if it were religion handed down by God.

I find cultural things interesting (sometime repulsive), but I ain’t gonna get real excited about it and I will NEVER see it as an excuse for crappy behavior.

Now if somebody really wants to smoke up their cuchy…I’m down widit…go smoke…who cares? But I am not getting excited about it…

Now weinnie smoking…well I might…just might fight about that.

27 Hipster 12.16.07 at 7:16 am

I haven’t had the time to read the replies and comments but I just want to point out that the article focuses on circumcized women a la tightening(since uncircumcized women don’t need tightening).
I personally have interviewed circumcized women during a campaign against FGM which was held during my university days.When they spoke of tightening, they always referred to stitching.None of them referred to Dukhan.

28 aimee 12.16.07 at 4:34 pm

don’t lie la, you have totally dated a sudanese girl before!!!

29 Drima 12.17.07 at 2:34 am

Howie, having spent my adult life mostly outside of Sudan has changed my attitude towards Sudanese culture. Faith I something I generally respect but culture is fair game.

Sudanese culture has many aspects that I find worthy of criticism. Other aspects, I value.

Hipster, that’s interesting. Your comment reaffirms Amru’s point. I guess my opinion of dukhan is what it is due to hearing too many Sudanese men (possibly naughty/pervy ones) focus about the tightening properties only.

Aimee, she was only a friend. :P

30 Hipster 12.17.07 at 5:48 am

Drima, I think tightening might be a by-product (if this is true), but not the main aim of the process.I think it’s unfair of the writer to generalize since not all Sudanese women are circumcized.

31 Dalu 12.17.07 at 5:03 pm

I am confused. If this women are circumcised. What more tightening do they need??? Wouldn’t that then be like trying to get a camel through a needle hole?

Drima, I think men focus on the tightening because it serves them well. The women might focus more on smelling pretty (But I highly doubt that they don’t do it for tightening reasons too…it just makes sense) But yea…

I should go out and ask different women about this.

I am too…intrigued.

32 Howie 12.17.07 at 5:24 pm

I wish women would focus more on tightening their tummies and butts…now THAT gets my attention…

Yeh baby…yeah!

33 Hipster 12.24.07 at 7:39 am

“I am confused. If this women are circumcised. What more tightening do they need??? Wouldn’t that then be like trying to get a camel through a needle hole?”

Dalu, like the article stated, the stitchings are removed or rather the hole is widened during delivery.That is why the circumcized women prefer to get stitched up again for their husbands! This further corroborates my comment ie “dukhan” is for healing and beautifying purposes mainly Like someone I know pointed out, the tightening is a natural result of the heat.Just like sauna, you come out with dry,tight and crinkly skin and have to moisturize it afterwards to restore its suppleness.

Howie,hehe, I concur!

34 Hipster 12.24.07 at 7:49 am

Dalu, like the article stated, the stitchings are removed or the holes are widened during delivery to facilitate childbirth.That is why circumcized women prefer getting stitched up afterwards for their husbands! By virtue of circumcision, the skin/hole(whatever) loses its ability to shrink again(excuse my crudeness).
This further corroborates my earlier comment ie “Dukhan” is mainly done for beautifying and healing purposes.

Someone I know pointed out something interesting.She said that the tightening is a natural result of the heat.Doesn’t the skin feel dry, tight and crinkly after a session of sauna?Maybe that part gets affected because it is the most exposed as the process is done whilst sitting.

Howie,hehe, I concur!

35 Hipster 12.24.07 at 7:53 am

Sry for the repetition.Read my second reply:)

36 nuba 10.02.09 at 9:14 pm

Awsome writing my friend, I praise you. It’s nice to know there are some sudanese cats who can actually think outside the box. Anyway, I’m with you on the dukhan issue. I think its a nasty ignorant tradition and should be done away with. All that malarky about tightening up is garbage.

Sudanese women (especially traditional ones) do not understand the concept of feminine hygene. The UN should provide emergency “douche” for this country, which is what the dukhan is, something to cover up the nasty smell of phat booty, 100 degree weather, hijab wearing vaginas.

Drima, keep pondering about the copious complexes of life and the universe.

Peace!

37 Dr Isaac 10.14.09 at 12:51 pm

i just wanna advise my lovely Sudanese babesss, you guys are dam beautiful, but you are not showing the world what you get, now it’s time to do that…..

38 Mysterious Girl 12.23.10 at 8:24 am

thank u dr isaac.. but we Sudanese ‘babes’ lol do show the world what we get but many are just not interested. :P

39 Jazmine 07.19.13 at 10:15 am

LOL your blog made me laugh. First timer (:
You should date a sudanese girl when you find one! (;
We’re kinda awesome like that!
No – but serious I like in London and it is so damn hard to find a sudanese guy! I know a few but their all ‘gangstas’ (or so they act like it (;)
Keep blogging!

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